Krakatoa

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High School Video Project!!!! Everyone Dies !!!The 1883 eruption ejected approximately 21 cubic kilometres (5.0 cu mi) of rock, ash, and pumice.[3] The cataclysmic explosion was distinctly heard as far away as Perth in Western Australia, about 1930 miles (3110 km) away, and the island of Rodrigues near Mauritius, about 3000 miles (5000 km) away.[citation needed] Near Krakatoa, according to official records, 165 villages and towns were destroyed and 132 seriously damaged, at least 36417 (official toll) people died, and many thousands were injured by the eruption, mostly from the tsunamis that followed the explosion. The eruption destroyed two-thirds of the island of Krakatoa. Eruptions at the volcano since 1927 have built a new island in the same location, named Anak Krakatau (Indonesian: “Child of Krakatoa”). This island currently has a radius of roughly 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) and a high point around 300 metres (980 ft) above sea level, growing 5 metres (16 ft) each year.[1] [edit]Origin and spelling of the name Although there are earlier descriptions of an island in the Sunda Strait with a “pointed mountain”, the earliest mention of Krakatoa by name in the Western world was on a 1611 map by Lucas Janszoon Waghenaer, who labeled the island “Pulo Carcata”. (Pulo is a form of pulau, the Indonesian word for “island”.) , including Crackatouw, Cracatoa, and Krakatao (in an older Portuguese-based spelling). The first known appearance of the spelling Krakatau was by Wouter ]]>

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